THE CAUSES AND THE COURSE OF CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE IN CHILDREN OF PRESCHOOL AGE

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Abstract

Background: Data on etiology and clinical course of CKD stage  3 to 5 in children of preschool  age could help obstetricians, pediatricians, and nephrologists with proper diagnostics and management of this condition and prediction of outcomes. Aim: To study causes and clinical features of CKD stage 3 to 5 in preschool  children. Materials and methods: The causes and clinical features of CKD stage 3 to 5 were investigated in 55 preschool children aged from 7 months  to 8 years. Twenty four had  CKD stage  3 to 4 and  31 children with endstage  CKD  were  on  peritoneal  dialysis. Results:96% of CKD stage 3 to 5 in preschool children were due  to  congenital/genetic kidney abnormalities. Predictors  of renal  replacement therapy  beginning in the first 5 years of life were as follows: antenatal detection of congenital  abnormalities  of the kidney and urinary tract, oligohydroamnion, high neonatal  BUN levels.  Anemia, hyperparathyroidism, arterial hypertension were more prevalent  in children on the dialysis stage of CKD, and myocardial hypertrophy and/or of the left ventricle dilatation were found in 26% of them. Forty two percent of children had growth retardation, and 40% had delayed  speech  development. Conclusion: The course CKD in preschool  children is characterized by a combination of typical metabolic  disorders with the growth  retardation (often dramatic) and delayed mental development that significantly limits the possibilities of the social adaptation of these children and social activities of their parents. Participation  of  neuropsychiatrists,  clinical psychologists, and teachers, rather than pediatricians and  nephrologists only, is desirable  in management of preschool children with CKD stage 3 to 5.

About the authors

T. Yu. Abaseeva

Moscow Regional Research and Clinical Institute

Author for correspondence.
Email: tatiana2103@inbox.ru
Abaseeva Tat'yana Yu. – PhD, Senior Research Fellow, Department of Pediatric Dialysis and Hemocorrection Russian Federation

T. E. Pankratenko

Moscow Regional Research and Clinical Institute

Email: tatiana2103@inbox.ru
Pankratenko Tat'yana  E. – PhD, Head of Department of Pediatric Dialysis and Hemocorrection Russian Federation

A. A. Burov

Moscow Regional Research and Clinical Institute

Email: tatiana2103@inbox.ru
Burov Aleksandr A. – Research Fellow, Department of Pediatric Dialysis and Hemocorrection Russian Federation

Kh. M. Emirova

Moscow State University of Medicine and Dentistry named after A.I. Evdokimov

Email: tatiana2103@inbox.ru
Emirova Khadizha M. – PhD, Associate Professor, Chair of Pediatrics Russian Federation

A. L. Muzurov

Russian Medical Academy of Postgraduate Education, Moscow

Email: tatiana2103@inbox.ru
Muzurov Aleksandr L. – PhD, Assistant Professor, Chair of Pediatric Anesthesiology, Resuscitation and Toxicology Russian Federation

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Copyright (c) 2015 Abaseeva T.Y., Pankratenko T.E., Burov A.A., Emirova K.M., Muzurov A.L.

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